Dissertation workshop

Unfortunately, Scrivener cannot put images as stand-alone elements into the Draft area, only as images onto a text page itself [Thanks to Romeo — see comments — for highlighting a former ambiguity here.]. I would not use Scrivener for fine-grained layout work or work with images in combination with text. But on the other hand, there is no need to. Remember that Scrivener is a program to write the text. It is not a layout program with which you can produce finished, perfectly formatted tables, graphics, or such-a-like. You have to use a different software for this — and there, Word does have it uses, although I prefer Apple Pages — or lately, InDesign. But actually, this is not a huge problem. Whenever I write about a Figure, Image, or Table I want to include, I create this part in a separate Pages file and write the file name in Scrivener, mark it in orange, and forget about it. When I create the finished version the highlighted text will remind me to simply copy-paste the figure or table at that place. Until then, I can concentrate on the writing. No use to use a software beyond its limits — Scrivener is for writing text and does this excellently, not for creating layouts.

13. Include a title on your proposal. I'm amazed at how often the title is left for the end of the student's writing and then somehow forgotten when the proposal is prepared for the committee. A good proposal has a good title and it is the first thing to help the reader begin to understand the nature of your work. Use it wisely! Work on your title early in the process and revisit it often. It's easy for a reader to identify those proposals where the title has been focused upon by the student. Preparing a good title means:

    ...having the most important words appear toward the beginning of your title,

    ...limiting the use of ambiguous or confusing words,

    ..breaking your title up into a title and subtitle when you have too many words, and

    ...including key words that will help researchers in the future find your work.
14. It's important that your research proposal be organized around a set of questions that will guide your research. When selecting these guiding questions try to write them so that they frame your research and put it into perspective with other research. These questions must serve to establish the link between your research and other research that has preceded you. Your research questions should clearly show the relationship of your research to your field of study. Don't be carried away at this point and make your questions too narrow. You must start with broad relational questions.

Dissertation workshop

dissertation workshop

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